Rock On

Literature Review


Singapore’s total population of residents and non-resident in 2020 is projected to be between 5.8 and 6 million, depending on our fertility trends, life expectancy, as well as our social and economic needs. The resident population (comprising of Singapore citizens and PRs) is projected to be 4 to 4.1 million, of which Singapore citizens alone will make up to 3.5 to 3.6 million.
By 2030, Singapore's total population could range between 6.5 and 6.9 million. There is a wider band of uncertainty, and the actual population will again depend on factors such as out fertility trends and life expectancy, the global and regional environment, our economic structure and social needs. The resident population (comprising of Singapore citizens and PRs) is projected to be 4.2 to 4.4 million, of which citizens alone will make up to 3.6 to 3.8 million.


In 2011, the World Population reached 7 billion which has doubled in the past 45 years, increasing by over 140 people every minute equivalent to another Los Angeles plus another Chicago every month. However, the amount of the resources per person is declining. In spite of modern technology, the lack of resources continue to worsen as our numbers increase by more than 70 million more people every year.


Each year the number of human beings increases, but the amount of natural resources with which to sustain this population, to improve the quality of human lives and to eliminate mass poverty remains finite. On the other hand, expanding knowledge increases the productivity of resources. Present rates of population growth cannot continue. They already compromise many governments' abilities to provide education, healthcare, and food security for people, much less their abilities to raise living standards. This gap between numbers and resources is all the more compelling because so much of the population growth is concentrated in low-income countries, ecologically disadvantaged regions, and poor households.


Most researchers that are all researching on this same problem believe that there is soon going to have overpopulation in different countries while other countries. While the others would just have a shortage of resources after selling or trading them with the other countries. Leading to the downfall of human species. Researchers also think that there would be disasters happening if there were not enough resources enough for everyone thus threatening the foundations of our way of life.  Thus this problem and issue has been considered as one of the more important tasks, as the increasing demand may continue to add strains from generations to generations. Countries such as California’s Sacramento and San Joaquin River have low-water storage levels. Water storage is a problem too. These could affect the climate changes to alot of countries out there.


Singapore’s total population of residents and non-resident in 2020 is projected to be between 5.8 and 6 million, depending on our fertility trends, life expectancy, as well as our social and economic needs. The resident population (comprising of Singapore citizens and PRs) is projected to be 4 to 4.1 million, of which Singapore citizens alone will make up to 3.5 to 3.6 million.
By 2030, Singapore's total population could range between 6.5 and 6.9 million. There is a wider band of uncertainty, and the actual population will again depend on factors such as out fertility trends and life expectancy, the global and regional environment, our economic structure and social needs. The resident population (comprising of Singapore citizens and PRs) is projected to be 4.2 to 4.4 million, of which citizens alone will make up to 3.6 to 3.8 million.
As of June this year, Singapore’s total population stood at 5.4 million, said the National Population and Talent Division (NPTD). The citizen population grew by 0.9 per cent to 3.31 million - and continued to grow older, with 11.7 per cent aged 65 and above. In 2002, those aged 65 and above comprised 7.8 per cent. The median age of the citizen population also rose to 40 years in 2013, up from 35.3 years in 2002.
The exponential growth of global population and our economic system threaten the foundations of our way of life. Many analysts claim this exponential growth has already exceeded the carrying capacity of the earth. If this is accurate, we have little time to reduce our growth and resource use to a level below the earth’s carrying capacity. If we do not act quickly and decisively we risk the collapse of our environment as well as our economic and social systems, just as happened to all the previous 18 complex societies in the earth’s history.

The amount of the resources per person is declining. In spite of modern technology, the lack of resources continue to worsen as our numbers increase by more than 70 million  people every year. While the current world population of about 7 billion is projected to top 8 billion by 2030, almost all of that growth is expected to come in the developing world.  In Africa and Asia, rural population nearly doubled between 1950 and 1985, with a corresponding decline in land availability.




Others:
http://www.gci.org.uk/Documents/The-Challenge-of-Sustainable-Economic-Growth-Revised1.pdf

No comments:

Post a Comment